Artemis Orion components

Artemis Orion components

  • Orion Crew Module: Four astronauts, cargo, from launch to landing, the only part that lands back on Earth. 10,387 kg.
  • Orion Crew Module Adaptor: Connects electrical, data and fluid systems between the main modules, contains electronic equipment for communications, power and control.
  • Orion Service Module (SM): Provides electricity, propulsion, air and water. 15,461 kg. SM components:
        • Propulsion: 33 engines, 3 types. 4 tanks with 8000 litres of fuel.
        • Thermal control system: Heater and coolant (6 radiators outside the SM).
        • Consumables: Air and water (for 6 astronauts on a 20-day mission).
        • Solar Arrays: Turn on 2 axes to remain aligned with the Sun. 4 arrays.
        • Chassis structure: Holds everything together, absorbs vibrations, covered with Kevlar.
        • Avionics: Computers control all aspects of the SM: Propulsion, water, electronics and temperature.
        • Three abort scenario using the SM:
            1. Untargeted abort splashdown,
            2. Targeted abort splashdown,
            3. Ascent abort to orbit.
Orion (CM + CMA + SM) sheet 2
Artemis Orion
European Service Module (ESM) Propulsion
European Service Module (ESM) Propulsion

Orion (officially Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle or Orion MPCV) is a partially reusable crewed spacecraft to be used in NASA’s Artemis program. The spacecraft consists of a Crew Module (CM) space capsule designed by Lockheed Martin and the European Service Module (ESM) manufactured by Airbus Defence and Space. Capable of supporting a crew of six beyond low Earth orbit, Orion can last up to 21 days undocked and up to six months docked. It is equipped with solar panels, an automated docking system, and glass cockpit interfaces modeled after those used in the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. A single AJ10 engine provides the spacecraft’s primary propulsion, while eight R-4D-11 engines, and six pods of custom reaction control system engines developed by Airbus, provide the spacecraft’s secondary propulsion. Although compatible with other launch vehicles, Orion is primarily intended to launch atop a Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, with a tower launch escape system.

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